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City of Seattle

September 4, 11:19 AM click here to comment > 0

New initiatives to support immigrant communities

Today Mayor Mike McGinn announced several new efforts to support immigrant and refugee communities in Seattle, including the creation of an Immigrant Voting Rights Taskforce. The taskforce, comprised of community leaders, academics and attorneys, will be tasked with making Seattle more voter-friendly for the more than 100,000 Seattle residents who are foreign-born.Mayor I&R 02

“This taskforce will get to the heart of many equity issues in the world of civic engagement for Seattle’s immigrant population,” said McGinn. “We have to strive as a city to meet the needs of all communities in getting their voice heard.”

The taskforce will look at a number of questions, including: more equitable placement of ballot boxes, registration deadlines for individuals who have just become citizens, extra outreach around voting to individuals who have become citizens, and linguistic assistance for non-English speakers. The goal is to evaluate what jurisdiction Seattle has over these issues and strategize how to lift institutional barriers through changes in policy and legislation. The Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, created in 2012, will oversee the taskforce’s work and provide staff support.

Read more »

Posted by: Words: April Thomas, Pictures: Jen Nance

September 3, 3:06 PM click here to comment > 0

The Reader – New immigrant voting rights taskforce

THE READER
From the Office of Mayor Mike McGinn
News, Updates, and Information
Click here to receive The Reader via email.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

New immigrant voting rights taskforce
Today Mayor Mike McGinn announced several new efforts to support immigrant and refugee communities in Seattle, including the creation of an Immigrant Voting Rights Taskforce. The taskforce, comprised of community leaders, academics and attorneys, will be tasked with making Seattle more voter-friendly for the more than 100,000 Seattle residents who are foreign-born.

“This taskforce will get to the heart of many equity issues in the world of civic engagement for Seattle’s immigrant population,” said McGinn. “We have to strive as a city to meet the needs of all communities in getting their voice heard.”

The taskforce will look at a number of questions, including: more equitable placement of ballot boxes, registration deadlines for individuals who have just become citizens, extra outreach around voting to individuals who have become citizens, and linguistic assistance for non-English speakers. The goal is to evaluate what jurisdiction Seattle has over these issues and strategize how to lift institutional barriers through changes in policy and legislation. The Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, created in 2012, will oversee the taskforce’s work and provide staff support.


Drop-in activities for some Seattle public school students if a strike happens
The City of Seattle announced Friday it will open and staff drop-in activities at 20 designated community centers for Seattle Public Schools students on free and reduced lunch from Kindergarten to 8th Grade if a strike delays the opening of Seattle Public Schools. The free program will operate from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. beginning Thursday, September 5 and include supervised recreation activities, with an anticipated supervision ratio of 20 children to 1 adult leader. Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Associated Recreation Council will staff these sites.

To sign up for these services, click here.


28 new or expanded community gardens made possible through 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy
Mayor McGinn announced the growth of the city’s P-Patch Community Gardening Program with an increase of 20 new or expanded P-Patch gardens over the past four years, with another eight gardens in the works.

This growth is a result of funding from the 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy, which originally provided $2 million for four new gardens. Due to strong partnerships with neighborhood volunteers and community organizations and the leveraging of funds, 22 new or expanded garden projects have been supported with this funding. In addition last December, the Levy Oversight Committee recommended the reallocation of $427,000 in inflationary funds which will support another six projects. In total, 28 projects providing more than 700 additional garden plots will have been added by 2014.

“The spirit of volunteerism in the community and the management of this program has made the public’s investment go much further,” said Mayor McGinn. “As the second largest program in the nation, I’m excited that our city’s P-Patch Program has grown to provide more community members from across the city the opportunity to grow fresh organic food, as well as engaging with their fellow gardeners and neighbors.”


Good news for LGBTQ City employees
Last week the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that all same-sex married couples will receive equal treatment under the tax code, regardless of whether their marriage is recognized in the state they reside in. This is great news for married couples in our community who have shouldered significant tax burdens that opposite-sex married couples do not face. For example, City of Seattle employees have been unfairly taxed on the health benefits we offer to their same-sex spouses and their children, potentially costing couples thousands of dollars a year.

With this new direction from the IRS, our Personnel Department is already working with Payroll to figure out the quickest way to stop taxing. They will also provide detailed information on how to file a claim for a refund from the IRS as soon as that information becomes available.

Read more.


Upcoming events (for more see http://seattle.gov/mayor/Engage/access.htm):
Sept 5, 11:00 a.m. – Third Annual Freeway Park Day Community Celebration, Freeway Park (700 Seneca St)

Sept 5, 5:30 p.m. – Laurelhurst Salmon BaKe and Play Area Dedication, Laurelhurst Community Center (4554 NE 41st St)

Sept 5, 6:00 p.m. – Parks Legacy Plan Citizens Advisory Committee Meeting, 100 Dexter Ave N

Sept 7, 2:00 p.m. – Earthquake Home Retrofit, Broadview Branch Library (12755 Greenwood Ave N)


What we’re reading:
As Amazon Stretches, Seattle’s Downtown Is Reshaped

Here are the world’s best Internet cities (Seattle made the cut)

Mayor’s Awards honor local luminaries in arts

Seattle a Leader in Job Growth

To subscribe to The Reader via email, click here.

Posted by: Nathaniel Merrill

September 3, 12:47 PM click here to comment > 0

Celebrating the New World Headquarters for Harley Marine Services

Last week I was honored to help celebrate the recently completed Harley and Lela Franco Maritime Center, the new world headquarters for Harley Marine Services (HMS) on Harbor Island. HMS has been a Seattle employer for over 30 years, and is one of the City’s key partners in the Maritime Industry, which provides more than 22,000 direct jobs and $5 billion in annual economic benefit to Seattle and the Puget Sound Region.

In 1987, Harley Franco started Olympic Tug & Barge with one leased tug and barge. Today, Olympic Tug & Barge is Harley Marine Services, Inc., employing 625 people in Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Dutch Harbor and the Gulf Coast.Jobs Plan - Harley Marine

In 1995, HMS was awarded a Mayor’s Small Business Award for its dedication to its employees, the environment, and the communities they serve. They are no longer a small company but those same commitments are still demonstrated in every aspect of what they do – their actions, their vessels, and their facilities.

Yesterday, we celebrated Harley Marine’s new world headquarters, a model for industrial re-investment in Seattle and beyond. The headquarters is designed to meet LEED® GOLD standards with aspirations for LEED® PLATINUM. It includes a 47,980 SF office building and an 8,970 SF shop building, all designed to balance industrial function with environmental protection.

Harley and Lela Franco envisioned it. Mithun Architects designed it. Schuchart Construction built it. The City of Seattle applied common sense to its codes so it and others like it could be permitted. And this visionary effort is leading the way. I heard from Schuchart Construction yesterday that at least one industrial firm has visited the new building and said, “I want one.”

To make this possible, the City was asked to approve a height exception that allowed the headquarters building to be taller, preserving space on the ground for critical tug and barge operations. That exercise, with leadership from Councilmember Richard Conlin, led to a permanent change to zoning regulations that apply to Seattle’s shoreline areas, allowing future re-investment to occur in a similar manner. Our experience with Harley and Lela also inspired us to partner with King County and Washington State to launch the Industrial Development Pilot Program, which generated good ideas from industry for regulatory and policy changes that would allow for easier redevelopment of our shoreline and ensure protection of the environment.

I want to thank Harley and Lela for the passion they consistently show for their community, their employees, and the environment. I’d also  like to acknowledge the Department of Planning and Development, and the Office of Economic Development for their support of this project and of our vital maritime economic sector.

Posted by: Mayor Mike McGinn

September 3, 11:42 AM click here to comment > 0

Good news for LGBTQ City employees

Last week the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that all same-sex married couples will receive equal treatment under the tax code, regardless of whether their marriage is recognized in the state they reside in. This is great news for married couples in our community who have shouldered significant tax burdens that opposite-sex married couples do not face. For example, City of Seattle employees have been unfairly taxed on the health benefits we offer to their same-sex spouses and their children, potentially costing couples thousands of dollars a year.

With this new direction from the IRS, our Personnel Department is already working with Payroll to figure out the quickest way to stop taxing. They will also provide detailed information on how to file a claim for a refund from the IRS as soon as that information becomes available.

When we announced a little over a year ago that the City was joining an amicus brief challenging the constitutionality of the federal “Defense of Marriage Act”, I never expected that we would come so far so fast. In the past year our state and others across the nation voted in marriage equality. The president of the United States declared his support for same-sex marriage rights for the first time. The U.S. military ended the discriminatory Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy. DOMA was struck down. Proposition 8 in California was struck down. And now even our tax code is catching up with the rising tide of equality.

Of course we have a long way to go. LGBTQ people at home in our community still face discrimination and even violence for being who they are. In many places in the world, things are getting worse for LGBTQ people, not better. There is a lot of work ahead of us. But I’d like to take this moment to honor the hard work of LGBTQ activists and their allies who have brought us so far on the road to equality in such a short period of time.

Now let’s get back to work.

Posted by: Mayor Mike McGinn

August 30, 3:50 PM click here to comment > 1

City to provide free drop-in activities at community centers for some Seattle public school students in event of school strike

The City of Seattle today announced it will open and staff drop-in activities at 20 designated community centers for Seattle Public Schools students on free and reduced lunch from Kindergarten to 8th Grade if a strike delays the opening of Seattle Public Schools. The free program will operate from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. beginning Thursday, September 5 and include supervised recreation activities, with an anticipated supervision ratio of 20 children to 1 adult leader. Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Associated Recreation Council will staff these sites.

“I urge the district and the teachers to do what it takes to reach an agreement and ensure our students are in the classroom on Wednesday,” said Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn. “If they do not reach an agreement, we are able to provide some drop-in services for the students most in need, but our capacity is limited.”

Due to space limitations, eligible students will be accepted as space permits each day. All students must have a completed registration form, which can be obtained at open community centers starting this weekend, at the community centers the day of the drop-in service, or online at http://www.seattle.gov/parks. A registration form still must be printed and brought to the community center if registration has been done online. Parents can secure a spot for their child in advance by going to https://class.seattle.gov/parks/Start/Start.asp beginning Saturday morning at 9:00 a.m., but those spaces will not be held past 9:00 a.m. each day of the drop-in service.

Parents are asked to drop off eligible children by 9:00 a.m. each day. Once signed in, children will only be released to the authorized contacts listed on the registration form (identification is required). Parents are also asked to drop off a sack lunch with their child each day if possible. Breakfast, drinks, and snacks will be provided to all students, and lunch will be provided to those students who are unable to bring their own.

The drop-in activities will be available at the following community centers:

  • Alki, 5817 Southwest Stevens Street
  • Ballard, 6020 28th Avenue Northwest
  • Bitter Lake, 13035 Linden Avenue North
  • Delridge, 4501 Delridge Way Southwest
  • Garfield, 2323 East Cherry Street
  • Hiawatha, 2700 California Avenue Southwest
  • High Point, 6920 34th Avenue Southwest
  • Jefferson, 3801 Beacon Avenue South
  • Loyal Heights, 2101 Northwest 77th Street
  • Magnolia, 2550 34th Avenue West
  • Magnuson, 7110 62nd Avenue Northeast
  • Meadowbrook, 10517 35th Avenue Northeast
  • Miller, 330 19th Avenue Northeast
  • Northgate, 10510 5th Avenue Northeast
  • Queen Anne, 1901 First Avenue West
  • Rainier, 4600 38th Avenue South
  • Ravenna-Eckstein, 6535 Ravenna Avenue Northeast
  • South Park, 8319 8th Avenue South
  • Van Asselt, 2820 South Myrtle Street
  • Yesler, 917 East Yesler Way

This service would be available until Friday, September 13, unless a strike ends and school begins before that date. If a strike continues beyond September 13, the City will examine its ability to continue providing this service.

Parks will also retain the summer Teen Center hours until school resumes in order to provide some daytime drop-in activities for teens. Geographically located Teen Centers are Meadowbrook, Garfield, and Southwest. Hours will be from noon to 8:00 pm on days when school is not in session due to a strike. Parks will also have regular Late Night programs at the following geographically based Community and Teen Centers: Bitter Lake, Delridge, High Point, Garfield Teen Center, Meadowbrook Teen Center, Rainier, Rainier Beach, Southwest Teen Center, South Park, and Van Asselt.

Posted by: April Thomas

August 30, 12:54 PM click here to comment > 0

28 new or expanded community gardens made possible through 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy

Mayor McGinn announced the growth of the city’s P-Patch Community Gardening Program with an increase of 20 new or expanded P-Patch gardens over the past four years, with another eight gardens in the works.Mayor P-Patch 01 sm

This growth is a result of funding from the 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy, which originally provided $2 million for four new gardens. Due to strong partnerships with neighborhood volunteers and community organizations and the leveraging of funds, 22 new or expanded garden projects have been supported with this funding. In addition last December, the Levy Oversight Committee recommended the reallocation of $427,000 in inflationary funds which will support another six projects. In total, 28 projects providing more than 700 additional garden plots will have been added by 2014.

“The spirit of volunteerism in the community and the management of this program has made the public’s investment go much further,” said Mayor McGinn. “As the second largest program in the nation, I’m excited that our city’s P-Patch Program has grown to provide more community members from across the city the opportunity to grow fresh organic food, as well as engaging with their fellow gardeners and neighbors.”

The 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy has an Oversight Committee which reviews expenditures, advises on allocation for upcoming budget years, and makes recommendations on Opportunity Fund expenditures. “The Levy Oversight Committee feels strongly that community gardens are important gathering places for our neighborhoods. The key word in community gardening is ‘community,’” says Pete Spalding, chair of the Levy Oversight Committee. “Our P-Patches serve as places where neighbors work together to grow not only food, but relationships as well. That’s why we recommended the additional dollars last December to provide more opportunities for community members.”

The announcement today was shared at the Unpaving Paradise P-Patch in Summit Slope Park, one of the projects partially funded by the levy. With a $150,000 investment and hundreds of hours of volunteer time, the garden was completed in 2011. This 37-plot P-Patch is now an urban oasis at the heart of one of Seattle’s densest neighborhoods, Capitol Hill.

“We hear every day from people walking through Summit Slope and Unpaving Paradise what a wonderful space we are lucky to have here,” says Saunatina Sanchez, a gardener at Unpaving Paradise. “I like to remind them that luck had nothing to do with it. This park is an example of a small community pulling together to make the neighborhood they live in a better place for everyone.”

As the 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy nears its expiration in 2014, we now have an opportunity to discuss which future investments are most important, and how best to make those investments. The current levy provided $146 million in taxpayer-supported funding of new green spaces, p-patches, neighborhood parks, recreational spaces, and playfields of all types. These spaces provide benefits to communities across the city.

A Parks Legacy Plan Citizen’s Advisory Committee has been formed to advise the Mayor and City Council as to longer term funding options. For information about the Committee’s work and how to engage in this process, visit www.seattle.gov/parks/legacy/committee.htm. The public is encouraged to attend these meetings. This committee will provide a recommendation to the Mayor McGinn and City Council by February of 2014, with a potential levy renewal going to voters in August or November of 2014.

Posted by: Words: April Thomas, Pictures: Jen Nance

August 28, 4:36 PM click here to comment > 1

Commemorating the 1963 March on Washington

On August 28, 1963, hundreds of thousands of Americans stood together on the National Mall in Washington D.C. to demand that all people be given justice and equality in jobs and pay, in businesses establishments and housing, in education, and in all things our society has to offer.

Today we commemorate the 50th anniversary of that landmark March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. This event helped change the course of our nation’s history. That history is fraught with pain, injustice, and cruelty for many of our country’s residents. Those in attendance helped achieve important victories that have brought us closer to a society where each of us can equally enjoy all the rights to which we are entitled.

50 years later, we have not yet achieved the race and social justice that the March on Washington demanded. Race still matters in education, in housing, in policing, and in employment. Inequality is a challenge we still face. We owe it to the people who marched on Washington to do everything we can to achieve the dream Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. described so well in his speech 50 years ago today.

Posted by: Mayor Mike McGinn

August 23, 3:18 PM click here to comment > 0

Celebrating Rave Green Day

Today Mayor McGinn declared August 25th to be “Rave Green Sunday” in honor of the Sounders’ upcoming match against the Portland Timbers. The mayor joined KEXP’s John Richards for the ceremonial delivery of the Rave Green proclamation to Sounders players.

mayor and john

Read more »

Posted by: April Thomas

August 23, 2:52 PM click here to comment > 6

The Reader – Seattle Gun Free Zone Program

THE READER
From the Office of Mayor Mike McGinn
News, Updates, and Information
Click here to receive The Reader via email.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

Washington CeaseFire Launches Seattle Gun Free Zone Program
Washington CeaseFire, joined by Mayor McGinn, announced the launch of a new program designed to help local businesses become “Gun Free Zones.” Businesses can opt into the program by visiting washingtonceasefire.org, signing the pledge to participate, and placing a “Gun Free Zone” decal in their window.

“We’re making a statement as a community” said Washington CeaseFire Board President Ralph Fascitelli. “We know this won’t stop someone determined to cause violence, but we hope that standing together and giving businesses a tool to say no to guns will change the conversation around gun violence. Maybe our message will even make it to Olympia – we need better tools now to stop gun violence in our community.”

Gun violence claims more than 31,000 lives every year in our country. In King County alone, more people die every year from gun violence than from motor vehicle collisions. This violence takes an enormous emotional and financial toll on victims and their families. Between 2007 and 2011, the estimated annual cost of firearms deaths and hospitalizations in King County was $177 million.

“We are here to support businesses that do not wish to have guns on their premises” said McGinn. “The police department regularly enforces trespass laws when a visitor to a business violates that business’s rules. We will continue to do so, and I thank these businesses for standing up for the safety of their customers.”


Update on Center City Initiative
The Mayor’s Office and the Evans School have convened a series of meetings under the rubric of the Center City Initiative, going back to last November, that have included a wide spectrum of downtown stakeholders. The purpose of these meetings has been to have open and frank conversations about how to improve public safety downtown and to effectively address needs of people in crisis living downtown. CCI is a groundbreaking collaboration among neighborhood leaders, business leaders, social service providers and civil rights advocates, all of whom agree that public safety & public order are priorities that can best be achieved by coordinating law enforcement efforts with targeted human services investment in a way that is smarter, more comprehensive, more strategic and more effective than past approaches.

These conversations have advanced several important policy and operational changes: Park Rangers, Police Enforcement, LEAD Expansion, Multi-Disciplinary Team, and Failure to Respond.

Read the details of these changes here.


Mayor proclaims “Rave Green Sunday” in honor of Sounders sold-out match
As the Seattle Sounders FC prepare for Sunday’s Cascadia Cup match against the Portland Timbers, Mayor McGinn has proclaimed Sunday, August 25 “Rave Green Sunday.” An estimated 66,500 people are expected to attend the nationally televised match Sunday evening.


Improving residential streets in Crown Hill, Greenwood and Wedgwood
To enhance residential roadway conditions, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) has completed chip sealing approximately 33 lane-miles of streets in the Crown Hill and Greenwood neighborhoods. This is in addition to the 12 lane-miles of residential roads in Wedgwood SDOT recently improved via a new process called microsurfacing.

Chip sealing is a cost-effective preventive maintenance measure that has been used in Seattle and other cities for many years to keep streets in good condition. Last undertaken in 2009, Seattle’s chip seal program was suspended due to the economic downturn and resulting budget crunch. Our 2013 budget allocated $1,450,000 to allow SDOT to resume this work and maintain a significant number of neighborhood streets.

These streets have a long history of chip sealing. Starting in 1967 the City used chip sealing to convert dirt and gravel streets in this area to paved streets. Approximately 25 percent of Seattle’s non-arterial streets have chip sealed surfaces. The process preserves the street by creating a skid-resistant surface that prevents water from penetrating the roadway subsurface, limiting deterioration and pothole formation.


An Update on the Economic Impacts of Coal Trains
Last year the Department of Transportation worked with engineers at Parametrix to understand how Seattle traffic would be impacted by the proposal to expand coal train operations in the region. The findings indicated that running as many as 18 coal trains per day through Seattle, each over a mile long, would significantly increase delays along the waterfront and in SODO. Railroad crossings would be blocked an additional one to three hours each day. More coal trains would separate our waterfront from the rest of the City, damaging valuable industrial, maritime, and tourism businesses that require access to and from the waterfront in order to perform their work.

These traffic and safety impacts raised a logical question: How would more coal trains impact our economy? Earlier this year, I asked the Office of Economic Development (OED) to commission a study on the economic impacts of coal trains in the City, with particular focus on waterfront and industrial businesses. OED contracted with Community Attributes, a local firm specializing in economic analysis, to perform this analysis.

The Community Attributes report highlights a number of significant and concerning impacts to the Seattle’s residents and businesses – businesses that are critical to maintaining our diverse economy.


What we’re reading:
With Proposed Rail Expansion, Northwest Confronts Its Clean Image

Seattle’s African service providers receive technology grants from the City

Tragedy spurs road safety changes in Wedgwood

What Coal Trains Would Cost Seattle


To subscribe to The Reader via email, click here.

Posted by: Nathaniel Merrill

August 20, 4:38 PM click here to comment > 4

Update on Center City Initiative

The Mayor’s Office and the Evans School have convened a series of meetings under the rubric of the Center City Initiative, going back to last November, that have included a wide spectrum of downtown stakeholders. The purpose of these meetings has been to have open and frank conversations about how to improve public safety downtown and to effectively address needs of people in crisis living downtown. CCI is a groundbreaking collaboration among neighborhood leaders, business leaders, social service providers and civil rights advocates, all of whom agree that public safety & public order are priorities that can best be achieved by coordinating law enforcement efforts with targeted human services investment in a way that is smarter, more comprehensive, more strategic and more effective than past approaches.

These conversations have advanced several important policy and operational changes:

Park Rangers: In June we added two new Park Ranger positions and also focused their work on known hot spots – Cal Anderson, Westlake, Occidental and Victor Steinbrueck parks. The added capacity and new focus means that the Rangers are able to have a more permanent presence in these four key parks. We are also working on an effort as part of the 2014 budget to provide dedicated SPD resources able to back up the Rangers whenever needed.

Police Enforcement: Since taking over the West Precinct over a year ago, Captain Dermody has focused on data driven policing and getting more officers out on the street. Proactive emphasis patrols have already been focusing on known “hot spots”. Last week we announced $400,000 in additional resources that will be used to augment this work through more violence prevention emphasis patrols. In the West Precinct this will mean 2 to 3 officers each week out on the street focusing on known trouble areas. We will also be prioritizing police resources in our 2014 budget.

LEAD Expansion: The Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program has been in effect in Belltown going on 2 years thanks to private grant funding. Through LEAD, officers are able to divert individuals who are causing problems or who need help into services and case management. SPD is able to work with other outreach workers to identify and prioritize known challenges. And instead of cycling individuals quickly through the criminal justice system, officers are able to give them a more productive path that is then monitored by a case manager. LEAD is a partnership between SPD, the City Attorney, the King County Prosecutor, the Mayor’s Office, the King County Sheriff, the Department of Corrections, the ACLU of Washington, the Public Defender Association, and community partners including the MID, the Downtown Seattle Association and the Belltown Community Council, as well as downtown social service providers. We are now looking at expanding LEAD to cover all of downtown.

Multi-Disciplinary Team: In preparation for LEAD expansion across all of downtown, we have set up a multi-disciplinary team that includes HSD outreach workers, SPD, the Park Rangers, and the MID Ambassadors. This group is now meeting weekly to strategize about addressing the needs and issues of individuals who have posed public order issues, with an initial focus on Westlake and Occidental Parks. Follow up will include outreach, service provision and, where appropriate, using traditional law enforcement tools in a way that is coordinated by all involved law enforcement agencies. We are working with Councilmember Sally Bagshaw to fund service dollars in the second quarter supplemental that will help stand up this work prior to LEAD expansion.

Failure to Respond: The City Attorney has agreed to file failure to respond charges on a case by case basis to provide a level of criminal justice accountability for repeat low level offenders who have received citations for behaviors such as sit/lie, public urination, and drinking in public. Captain Dermody has developed a priority list of repeat offenders and that has been submitted to the City Attorney. It is expected that the multi-disciplinary team will help prioritize these and other individuals for failure to respond citations if that is deemed the most effective way to change the individual’s behavior.

Posted by: Mayor Mike McGinn